Metric Recipe for Fluffy American Style Pancakes

First published: 18 Jun 2018

Over the past 6 months, I’ve been making pancakes for my family on Sunday mornings. My kids love American style pancakes covered in fruit and maple syrup, but I found it hard to find a metric recipe that worked for me, so I had to experiment and make quite some tweaks to get it how I like it. Want to make your own? Scroll past the pic to find out how!

I’m getting quite good at making pancakes!

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Makes ~10 big pancakes

Ingredients:

  1. 450g self raising flour, sifted
  2. 1 tiny pack of baking powder
  3. A small amount of sugar
  4. 450ml buttermilk (Karnemilk in the Netherlands)
  5. 3 large egg.
  6. Whisk together by hand until all the lumps are gone
  7. Leave to sit for 15 minutes

Once you’ve got the mix together, throw a large non-stick frying pan onto your hob and set it on a medium heat (I have a conductive hob that has a ten point scale, I set mine to five). You want the pan to be nice and warm when the mix is ready. There is no need to add any butter or oil to lubricate the pan as it’s non-stick. If you don’t have a non-stick pan (and I would advise getting one, they’re awesome) Once it’s up to temperature, drop a small blob of batter on the pan to give it a test.

You’ll need to watch the pancake carefully to know when to flip it. Usually, you’ll start seeing little bubbles appearing in the batter as the baking powder starts doings it’s thing, next the batter will start to solidify and it’s shine will slowly disapear to more of a matte finish. Once it gets to this stage, you should be able to slide a spatula underneath and lift it and not leave any pancake goo behind. Success? Great, then go ahead and flip it!

Give it about a minute to cook the other side and then flip it again, If it’s still pale, no problem flip it back over and give it a little longer. Keep flipping and checking until it’s gone a light shade of golden brown and then you should be good to go!

Now scrape it up your sample pancake and cut it in half. It should be cooked all the way through with no gooey bits. If that’s the case then your pan is at the right temperature and you can begin cooking the rest of your batch. If it’s still gooey, give your pan a little longer to heat up, and or pop the heat up a notch.

Good luck on your pancake making journey and feel free to share your pictures or questions with me on Twitter!

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